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7 Common Japanese Breakfast Dishes

Typical Japanese Breakfast

Nothing showcases the rich tapestry of flavors and textures found in Japanese cuisine more than their morning customs. We explore the delightful world of Japanese breakfast dishes in this article, which offers a distinctive start to the day by fusing culinary mastery with cultural heritage. The Japanese breakfast is a vibrant celebration of flavors, textures, and nutritional balance, ranging from straightforward but satisfying staples like rice, miso soup, and grilled fish to more elaborate morning feasts featuring tamagoyaki (Japanese omelet), natto (fermented soybeans), and pickled vegetables. This morning spread is a tribute to Japan’s love of seasonal, fresh food and well-balanced meals. Every dish narrates a tale of custom, careful planning, and a steadfast dedication to culinary artistry. Our guide will take you through the wide variety of typical Japanese breakfast dishes, whether you’re a food explorer or a breakfast enthusiast. We invite you to enjoy the subtleties and rich cultural heritage of this early morning culinary experience.

1. Rice

Rice
Source: Instagram

While Americans are used to cooking steamed rice for dinner or lunch, the Japanese also enjoy this starchy treat for breakfast. I like it because it’s easy to cook and extremely versatile. I’ve enjoyed Japanese rice in breakfast bowls that include chilled brown or white rice. I find that the most delicious bowls include chilled white rice, some green onions, eggs, and avocados. I usually add a touch of soy or sesame sauce for flavor. Because rice goes with just about anything, it’s easy to experiment with different flavors and foods. I’ve also found adding some lox or fruit to cold rice makes for a tasty breakfast. 


2. Miso Soup

Miso Soup
Source: Instagram

Miso soup might be a popular Japanese breakfast food because of its health benefits. The miso paste can promote better gut health and good bacteria. Traditional miso soup contains dashi stock, miso paste, scallions, and tofu. I’ve found it’s relatively easy to make and usually doesn’t take more than 40 minutes. Although most Americans don’t think of soup as a breakfast food, it can be! When I leave the onions out, the flavor of miso soup is a tad blander. Like oatmeal, the soup can be comforting during the cold fall and winter mornings. I also like the energy rush it gives me.


3. Japanese Pancakes 

Japanese Pancakes 
Source: Instagram

So how are Japanese pancakes different from their American counterparts? Well, they’re probably just as sweet. However, they’re a little more fluffy, like soufflé. Japanese pancakes can include some of the same staple ingredients most people already have in their cupboards and pantries. Just gather up some eggs, milk, sugar, baking powder, flour, vanilla extract, and vegetable oil. The main difference I’ve found is I have to whip up some egg whites. I also have to mix the batter separately from the egg whites. However, the taste is just as delicious and sugary as the American version. I can also buy premade Japanese pancake mixes if I don’t want to make them from scratch.

See also  What Is Tako Sushi?

4. Tamagoyaki

Tamagoyaki
Source: Instagram

Tamagoyaki is the Japanese version of the omelet. But instead of using eggs and a mix of cheese, meats, and veggies, the Japanese incorporate dashi, soy sauce, and mirin. Plus, tamagoyaki consists of omelets that are shaped into rectangles.  So, there’s more of a soft texture here that doesn’t require extra hot sauce to make the cooked eggs more delicate. Added sugar balances out the tang of the soy sauce, but I’ve found tamagoyaki is a refreshing diversion from traditional American breakfast cuisine.


5. Tamago Gohan

Tamago Gohan
Source: Instagram

In my opinion, Tamago Gohan is one of the best Japanese breakfast foods. It’s a breakfast bowl with rice, egg yolks, soy sauce, and sesame seeds. But it’s one of the ultimate comfort foods that are like a warm casserole at the end of a hard day. The only difference is I’m starting my day with equal part carbs and protein. I think Tamago Gohan is great because it’s so filling. I don’t get hungry a few hours later. This popular Japanese breakfast food carries me through until lunch every time.


6. Okayu

Okayu
Source: Instagram

Got a sweet tooth and prefer something sugary in the morning? Okayu is sure to hit the spot as a classic rice porridge. It’s like rice pudding, but I can top it with whatever I want. I can add salmon, pickled plums, or seaweed. Yes, I know some of those toppings might not appeal to everyone. However, okayu is a popular breakfast food for a reason. Part of that is its rice base, which goes with a lot of different toppings and foods. The other is because it’s easy to make and can be made as a bland breakfast food as well. When I have a bit of a tummy ache and still need to eat, I can count on okayu in the morning. Sometimes I add a dash of cinnamon and vanilla extract to give it more of a sweet taste. I know you’ll like it!


7. Dorayaki

Dorayaki
Source: Instagram

Dorayaki is two pancakes with a sweet, red bean paste in the middle. The pancakes are made with honey, giving dorayaki an extra dose of sweetness. Sometimes I like to eat this treat like a cookie. But I’ve also discovered I can dip dorayaki in a bit of syrup or spread jelly on the top. Dorayaki also tastes good with other types of filing. Think nut butter, custard, and creme fillings. These are great pancakes and breakfast foods to try out with family, friends, and guests. If I had a bed and breakfast, I would add dorayaki to the breakfast menu for sure.

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Written by Brian Nagele

Brian attended West Virginia University, then started his career in the IT industry before following his passion for marketing and hospitality. He has over 20 years experience in the restaurant and bar industry.

As a former restaurant owner, he knows about running a food business and loves to eat and enjoy cocktails on a regular basis. He constantly travels to new cities tasting and reviewing the most popular spots.

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